Florida Legal Malpractice Blog

The very nature of the practice of law requires that clients place their lives, their money, and their causes in the hands of their lawyers with a degree of blind trust that is paralleled in very few other economic relationships. The Florida Bar v. Dancu, 490 So. 2d 40, 41 (Fla. 1986)
Monday, December 16, 2013, Continue reading at the source
The very nature of the practice of law requires that clients place their lives, their money, and their causes in the hands of their lawyers with a degree of blind trust that is paralleled in very few other economic relationships. The Florida Bar v. Dancu, 490 So. 2d 40, 41 (Fla. 1986)
Monday, December 16, 2013, Continue reading at the source
Chutzpah is a Yiddish term which is defined as personal confidence or courage that allows someone to do or say things that may seem shocking to others. This term came to mind recently when a lawyer in Tampa, who actively advertises for Plaintiff's legal malpractice cases, called me with a “legal malpractice question”. I often respond to questions from legal malpractice defense lawyers who seek out my assistance. These inquires typically involve areas of Florida law to which there are no answers and I find the exchange intellectually stimulating. It is also always interesting to see how the dark side is thinking and, yes, my ego is massaged by the phone call. However, I never assist competitors without compensation. When I did not respond to the competitor's phone call, I thought that would end the matter. Silly me. In a display of “chutzpah”, the lawyer, or more likely, one of his assistants, contacted me with an inquiry through Martindale Hubbell. He posted a question which had been asked by a trial court judge during trial. I did not respond. What I wanted to say was buy my book ,Florida Legal Malpractice and Attorney Ethics, it has all the answers.
Thursday, December 12, 2013, Continue reading at the source
Chutzpah is a Yiddish term which is defined as personal confidence or courage that allows someone to do or say things that may seem shocking to others. This term came to mind recently when a lawyer in Tampa, who actively advertises for Plaintiff's legal malpractice cases, called me with a “legal malpractice question”. I often respond to questions from legal malpractice defense lawyers who seek out my assistance. These inquires typically involve areas of Florida law to which there are no answers and I find the exchange intellectually stimulating. It is also always interesting to see how the dark side is thinking and, yes, my ego is massaged by the phone call. However, I never assist competitors without compensation. When I did not respond to the competitor's phone call, I thought that would end the matter. Silly me. In a display of “chutzpah”, the lawyer, or more likely, one of his assistants, contacted me with an inquiry through Martindale Hubbell. He posted a question which had been asked by a trial court judge during trial. I did not respond. What I wanted to say was buy my book ,Florida Legal Malpractice and Attorney Ethics, it has all the answers.
Thursday, December 12, 2013, Continue reading at the source
It happens about a dozen times a year, the most recent occasion was about a week ago. I received a phone call from a young lawyer inexperienced in suing lawyers who was tasked with hiring a legal malpractice “expert” for a legal malpractice case her midsized local firm was involved in. The partner in charge of the file told her to go find an “expert”. When I asked her what the case involved, she told me it involved a foreclosure case. When I tried to tell her that she needed an “expert” in foreclosure litigation, she sternly asked me why I could not help her because she perceived me to be an “expert” in legal malpractice. Rather than educate her, I simply told I would be unable to help her. Without hesitation, she asked if I knew anybody that could. I said I did not. For the sake of her client, like the blind chicken who picks up kernels now and again, I am hopeful she found the right “expert”. Of course, in a legal malpractice case, the “expert” you need is one who has knowledge in the underlying substantive area, whatever that might be.
Wednesday, November 27, 2013, Continue reading at the source
It happens about a dozen times a year, the most recent occasion was about a week ago. I received a phone call from a young lawyer inexperienced in suing lawyers who was tasked with hiring a legal malpractice “expert” for a legal malpractice case her midsized local firm was involved in. The partner in charge of the file told her to go find an “expert”. When I asked her what the case involved, she told me it involved a foreclosure case. When I tried to tell her that she needed an “expert” in foreclosure litigation, she sternly asked me why I could not help her because she perceived me to be an “expert” in legal malpractice. Rather than educate her, I simply told I would be unable to help her. Without hesitation, she asked if I knew anybody that could. I said I did not. For the sake of her client, like the blind chicken who picks up kernels now and again, I am hopeful she found the right “expert”. Of course, in a legal malpractice case, the “expert” you need is one who has knowledge in the underlying substantive area, whatever that might be.
Wednesday, November 27, 2013, Continue reading at the source
What is Legal Malpractice? Do you know what constitutes legal malpractice? Legal malpractice is when an attorney falls below the standard of care required of attorneys in a similar situation. Simply stated, it is when an attorney fails to do something he should have done or does something incorrectly. For example, if you hire an attorney and that attorney fails to file your lawsuit within the time period in which such lawsuit must be filed, then that lawyer has committed legal malpractice. If you have suffered as a result of your attorney's wrongdoing, contact my firm to arrange a time when we can discuss your case.
Thursday, September 20, 2012, Continue reading at the source
What is Legal Malpractice? Do you know what constitutes legal malpractice? Legal malpractice is when an attorney falls below the standard of care required of attorneys in a similar situation. Simply stated, it is when an attorney fails to do something he should have done or does something incorrectly. For example, if you hire an attorney and that attorney fails to file your lawsuit within the time period in which such lawsuit must be filed, then that lawyer has committed legal malpractice. If you have suffered as a result of your attorney's wrongdoing, contact my firm to arrange a time when we can discuss your case.
Thursday, September 20, 2012, Continue reading at the source